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Admin
Pupule

USA
4542 Posts

Posted - 03/22/2005 :  4:22:01 PM  Show Profile  Visit Admin's Homepage  Send Admin an AOL message  Send Admin an ICQ Message  Send Admin a Yahoo! Message


The G7th capo is an interesting product that I tried briefly while on my visit to San Diego (thanks Keith.) I’ve tried a couple of other capos in the past. There are those that have a strong spring that can be easily put on and taken off with one hand, can be clipped to the headstock when you’re not using it but you cannot adjust the tension. The downside is that sometimes the tension is too tight resulting in the guitar being way out of tune. The other kind is adjustable but you cannot clip it anywhere when you’re not using it and usually you need two hands to adjust the tension.

With sort of a space age look, the G7th capo uses a "new patented clutch mechanism" that achieves the best of both worlds. When I tried Keith’s G7th, I was impressed right away with the simplicity of operation. Well actually, I was a little confused just looking at it but he explained it quickly. "Just squeeze it on and lift the lever to take it off."

You place it over the fret you want and just squeeze, first softly and then maybe a little tighter to make sure no strings are buzzing. One of the strengths of the G7th capo is that it can adjust in tiny increments and this can be done very quickly and easily. Moreover, since it is adjustable, the guitar stays in tune. In simplest terms, it’s like having a clamp that holds it position as you close its grip. Lift the lever and it opens up. I’ve only had mine for a couple of days but so far I like it. Okay, I like it a lot or else I wouldn't be writing about it.

Designed/invented by Nick Campling of the UK, the G7th capo has been on the market for about a year. It’s already been awarded Guitarist magazine's 'Gold Award' in the UK, and an Acoustic Guitar magazine bronze award in the US. No doubt, a new approach to capo design. It retails for approximately $40 which, to me, is at the higher end of the price range for a capo but it works really well on my guitar. Customer service appears to be highly responsive judging by the website’s offer to replace any faulty product and a willingness to listen to customer feedback – there was an issue with their early production which has since been remedied. I have read some people comment in other newsgroups that the fit is not as good on some guitar necks as others. But, I highly recommend trying it to see if it fits your guitar and your needs.

For more info, visit http://www.g7th.com

Andy

Auntie Nancy
`Olu`olu

USA
593 Posts

Posted - 03/23/2005 :  12:27:32 AM  Show Profile
Mahalo Andy,
I briefly looked at their website and it looks like they only have one size...
Does it work well with all neck widths do you think?
A capo is another purchase I'll be needing to make one of these days.
Aloha!!
auntie

nancy cook
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David
Akahai

92 Posts

Posted - 03/23/2005 :  12:40:49 PM  Show Profile  Send David an ICQ Message
Almost bought one a couple months ago, but opted for a Paige to go along with my Shubb and Kaiser. The Paige fits in my Altoids box, with other misc. necessities.
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Auntie Nancy
`Olu`olu

USA
593 Posts

Posted - 03/23/2005 :  2:00:25 PM  Show Profile
OK, I give, what are altoids??

nancy cook
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David
Akahai

92 Posts

Posted - 03/23/2005 :  4:28:05 PM  Show Profile  Send David an ICQ Message
Altoids are nice fire breathing, super charged breath mints, and they come in a metal hinged boxes. I've found these boxes handy for picks, slides and now one has a Paige capo. I have two in use now, for guitars and banjo. They fit easily in a pocket, gig-bag or case.

I just recalled another use, and that's as a box for q-tips. They fit perfectly, and it's become an essential part of my dop kit for travel.

Edited by - David on 03/23/2005 5:48:36 PM
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Admin
Pupule

USA
4542 Posts

Posted - 03/23/2005 :  5:59:16 PM  Show Profile  Visit Admin's Homepage  Send Admin an AOL message  Send Admin an ICQ Message  Send Admin a Yahoo! Message
quote:
Originally posted by Auntie Nancy

I briefly looked at their website and it looks like they only have one size...
Does it work well with all neck widths do you think?

It's really hard for me to say. Best bet would be try one at the shop or maybe at the next SDSKS meeting, Keith will let you try his? The website does say the following:
quote:
Will the G7th capo work on my Classical Guitar?
Many customers do use their G7th capo on their classical. However, as the profile of the capo is curved and a classical fingerboard is flat it's not ideal.

Do you plan to make a G7th capo for the Classical guitar?
We currently have a dedicated classical capo in development which will be launched late 2005.


Andy
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Auntie Nancy
`Olu`olu

USA
593 Posts

Posted - 03/24/2005 :  02:24:48 AM  Show Profile
Mahalo Andy!!
n

nancy cook
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Karl Monetti
`Olu`olu

USA
756 Posts

Posted - 03/24/2005 :  11:45:04 AM  Show Profile  Visit Karl Monetti's Homepage
Altoids are actually those big muscles on your shoulders that push stuff up in the air, hence the name, altoids...or was that adenoids I was thinking about????

I've seen those G7s advertized and wondered about how well they would work for 40 bucks. I have a couple kysers which are definitely easy to use, but on my guitars they put the two bass strings out of tune if i capo past the 4th fret. And on my regal dobro, with eveen heavier strings, the 3 lowest strings go out of tune! Makes for a lot of retuning. I don't recall that having been a problem with the old rubber ones with elastic band hookups, but they were such a pain to deal with inother ways (although it is still what Kelly Joe Phelps uses on his lap guitar) I recall watching david Rawlings (Gillian Welch) capo up and down the neck with his kyser with no retuning at all, and severkl other performers who have come thru our town don't seem to have the problem either. Could it be my technique....geez, what can go wrong with putting on a capo! It ain't rocket science. Hey, maybe that is it; my wife is a card carrying rocket scientist, I'll see if the kyser works better when she puts it on. Don;t hle your breath, but i wil try to report my highly scientific findings inthe next journal of the american capo society (ACS to you)
I might try one of the G7s.

Karl
Frozen North
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David
Akahai

92 Posts

Posted - 03/24/2005 :  7:30:56 PM  Show Profile  Send David an ICQ Message
Right you are about the spelling of kyser. This capo sure is fast, but I find it applies fairly brutal pressure. They do have a tendancy to pull out of tune, and I've grown accustomed to screw-down tension types. But the G7 looked intriguing to me, and the salesman at the store I frequent was very up on this product. Looks good for rapid fretting at an effective pressure. I was uncerain how it would cope with my varied neck thicknesses. But I filed the G7 away in my memory banks as a probable purchase.
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Reid
Ha`aha`a

Andorra
1526 Posts

Posted - 03/25/2005 :  02:31:25 AM  Show Profile
I am not sure why there is a need for speed in capo use. The roller Shubbs, and even the screw-on Victor, take only a few seconds to put on, and the adjustment screws (also a second or 2) preclude detuning.

Is this an issue in performance? Modulating to another key inside a song? Would anybody care to enlighten me?

...Reid

PS. Not all "classicals" have flat fretboards. Mine has a radius and even an old, inherited Yamaha that I started out on did, too.
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Fran Guidry
Ha`aha`a

USA
1472 Posts

Posted - 03/25/2005 :  08:17:50 AM  Show Profile  Visit Fran Guidry's Homepage
quote:
Originally posted by Karl Monetti

... other performers who have come thru our town don't seem to have the problem either. Could it be my technique....geez, what can go wrong with putting on a capo! It ain't rocket science. ...



There certainly is a technique to using a capo. It was explained to me by the docs that came with my Victor. The trick is to get as close as possible to the fret, rather than in the open area between frets. By clamping the string directly to the fret the string pull and resultant detuning is minimized.

Of course, if the capo is big and bulky it interferes with the fretting hand.

Fran

E ho`okani pila kakou ma Kaleponi
Slack Key Guitar in California - www.kaleponi.com
"Kaleponi" at CD Baby
Slack Key on YouTube
Homebrewed Music Blog
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slackkeymike
Lokahi

440 Posts

Posted - 03/29/2005 :  03:38:08 AM  Show Profile
Uh, perhaps I missed it, but where do you put it when you do not need it? Is as simple as kyser?

Mike

Aloha, Mike
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Admin
Pupule

USA
4542 Posts

Posted - 03/29/2005 :  04:29:29 AM  Show Profile  Visit Admin's Homepage  Send Admin an AOL message  Send Admin an ICQ Message  Send Admin a Yahoo! Message
quote:
Originally posted by slackkeymike

Uh, perhaps I missed it, but where do you put it when you do not need it? Is as simple as kyser?
You can clip the G7th to the headstock of your guitar.

Kyser = squeeze, release;
G7th = open, squeeze closed.

Almost as simple.

Andy
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Karl Monetti
`Olu`olu

USA
756 Posts

Posted - 03/29/2005 :  10:39:16 AM  Show Profile  Visit Karl Monetti's Homepage
Well, any of you who were having the same trouble i was with bass strings going out of tune when capoing up the neck will be pleased to know that Fran was correct (of course) about the importance of placement of the capo within the fret space. True, I had always placed it approx. 1/3 of the fret space width behind he fret itself. Trying it as Fran suggested, with the capo just barely behind the fret,makes all the difference in the world. So, no need for this multi-kyser owner to buy something new (and expensive). Unless,of course, everyone else gets one, then i would not be "in" so ..................

Karl
Frozen North
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Bill Neubauer
Aloha

USA
34 Posts

Posted - 03/29/2005 :  6:11:54 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bill Neubauer's Homepage
Aloha. Like Fran suggested, I usually try to capo as near to the fret as possible, but I really get annoyed by bumping my fretting hand into the capo. Why can't they be flat? I have a Keyser that I use sometimes, but I think I like my rolling capo the best, even if I don't need it to change keys, within a song or to go to the next song. I'm sorry, but I don't remember who makes it. I actually only bought it because of one song I like to sing; "L-O-V-E" by Nat King Cole, which he sings through the first time in G, then the flugelhorn solo plays it through up a half-step in Ab, then Nat sings it all again in A. I just didn't want to bother with playing in Ab (oops, sorry - this all has nothing to do with Slack). But I've never worked out a smooth transition for rolling up between sections. Maybe I'll just try arranging it in Taro Patch, and forget about the key changes.

Bill

Kika Pila
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Leonard
Lokahi

USA
124 Posts

Posted - 03/31/2005 :  10:47:16 AM  Show Profile  Visit Leonard's Homepage
I'm using a shubb right now, with the mechanism over the top of the neck and under it, but I wanted to mention another type. I am annoyed by my hand bumping into capos, which happens when the capo extends beside the fingerboard or under it. Most capos seem to have not much stuff above the fretboard, but that area wouldn't be in the way. For my classical guitar, I have an old Spanish capo (probably a flamenco accessory), made of ebony, which sits entirely above the fingerboard with nothing hanging over. It's shaped kind of like a half-moon. A piece of nylon string, attached to a tapered ebony peg (like a little violin peg) runs from the capo around the neck and back up above, where the tapered peg fits in a hole. You put the half-moon in place on the space between the selected frets with the flat edge down, bring the nylon around the neck and back up, put the peg in the hole and twist to tighten. The great thing is that there's nothing to run your hand against, because it's all above the fingerboard. Of course, the flat surface is flat, not curved, because most classical and flamenco necks are flat. And I'm not sure the tapered peg is secure or strong enough for steel strings. But maybe the capo manufacturers should get some ideas from it. I don't know why they always put the mechanism under the neck, where it gets in the way, instead of over it where it's out of the way. LRR

Be the change that you wish to see in the world. M. Gandhi
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