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 Hawaiian Slack Key Guitar / Hawaiian Music
 Kalele OnaLani
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parotatch
Aloha

37 Posts

Posted - 07/23/2007 :  8:16:43 PM  Show Profile
Heard a song yesterday at the Big Island Hawaiian
Music Festival and was wondering if anyone has
heard of it. I'm told it very old and was written by the
Queen (I'm assuming Lili) and its title is
"Kalele Onalani". Anyone know anything about this
song, recording, lyrics?

Auntie Maria
Ha`aha`a

USA
1918 Posts

Posted - 07/23/2007 :  9:20:28 PM  Show Profile
Composed for Queen Emma, "Kaleleonalani" has been recorded by quite a few folks. Most recently:

Pekelo on "Hana by the Sea"
Kawika Kahiapo on "One Heart, One Voice"
Nina Keali`iwahamana on "Nina"
Peter Moon Band on "Best of..." and "Iron Mango"
Makaha Sons on "A Portrait of Tropical Music"

Here's what huapala.org sez about the mele:
http://www.huapala.org/Kaleleonalani.html

Auntie Maria
===================
My "Aloha Kaua`i" radio show streams FREE online every Thu & Fri 7-9am (HST)
www.kkcr.org - Kaua`i Community Radio
"Like" Aloha Kauai on Facebook, for playlists and news/info about island music and musicians!

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Mika ele
Ha`aha`a

USA
1488 Posts

Posted - 07/24/2007 :  11:25:18 AM  Show Profile
You can find the sheet music in King's Book of Hawaiian Melodies (the Blue Book) on page 142. It is in 4/4 time written in the key of Ab Major. The chord notation is interesting, 1Ab, 2Ab, 1Db, etc.

E nana, e ho'olohe. E pa'a ka waha, e hana ka lima.
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slipry1
Ha`aha`a

USA
1478 Posts

Posted - 07/24/2007 :  11:38:10 AM  Show Profile
quote:
Originally posted by Mika ele

You can find the sheet music in King's Book of Hawaiian Melodies (the Blue Book) on page 142. It is in 4/4 time written in the key of Ab Major. The chord notation is interesting, 1Ab, 2Ab, 1Db, etc.


That's what ya get with Ab - in C it's 1C, 2C, 3F. It's all relative, you know.

keaka
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noeau
Ha`aha`a

USA
1105 Posts

Posted - 07/26/2007 :  7:42:16 PM  Show Profile
Why play in G# is beyond me.

No'eau, eia au he mea pa'ani wale nō.
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hwnmusiclives
`Olu`olu

USA
580 Posts

Posted - 07/27/2007 :  02:46:16 AM  Show Profile  Visit hwnmusiclives's Homepage
quote:
Originally posted by noeau

Why play in G# is beyond me.



Because keys convey moods. Try playing a song you ordinarily play or sing in D in Eb instead. It will be no more or less difficult to sing for your vocal range, but it will FEEL different. Some keys convey sadness and others joy. (Seriously, it would be difficult to perform "Aloha `Oe" in A, but try performing "Hanohano Hawai`i" or "Lei `Ohu" in A. Hmmm...!) Sometimes you have no control over the key you perform in because your vocal range is settled into a particular key for that particular song. But when you can try a key up or a key down, see how it makes you feel different and ask a listener how it makes them feel different.

Listen to the slack key players and you will find that even though they are tuned to "taro patch" or some other tuning, they may not be tuned to "G taro patch." It might be F# or G#. Keola Beamer does this quite often.

Join me for the history of Hawaiian music and its musicians at Ho`olohe Hou at www.hoolohehou.org.
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thumbstruck
Ha`aha`a

USA
1968 Posts

Posted - 07/27/2007 :  03:56:13 AM  Show Profile
Often a different key will bring out the sweetness of the guitar. My D18 sounds great in "E", so sometimes I capo on the 4th fret and play in "C" position. More ear-candy.
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noeau
Ha`aha`a

USA
1105 Posts

Posted - 07/27/2007 :  07:03:10 AM  Show Profile
well capo is good. I was being facetious since chord fingering in standard tuning gets cumbersome in some keys. Like I don't like to play in F or Bb for example. So G# was just my way of making a joke. Because it seems odd to write a song in Ab.

No'eau, eia au he mea pa'ani wale nō.
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Rlowenote
Akahai

84 Posts

Posted - 07/27/2007 :  07:10:36 AM  Show Profile
I can't really see the "keys conveys moods" on it's own. Bringing the vocal range of the singer/singers and/or the instrument into the picture would have an effect on things though.

When I see the "key", it is how many sharps or flats. I was brought up on "key signature". This is not taking into account the Major vs. Minor chords. One question was something like "why G#?"

I change keys on many songs I sing to fit my range. Sometimes I have to change it by a 1/2 step again to accomodate instruments involved. If I hear mostly strings, it's probably a key with sharps. If I hear horns, then it'll probably be a key with flats.


Edited by - Rlowenote on 07/27/2007 07:42:27 AM
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hwnmusiclives
`Olu`olu

USA
580 Posts

Posted - 07/27/2007 :  07:34:39 AM  Show Profile  Visit hwnmusiclives's Homepage
quote:
Originally posted by Rlowenote

I can't really see the "keys conveys moods" on it's own.



No, seriously. This is commonly taught in music theory. Why else would "major" and "minor" exist? Not merely as an exercise in applying different scales.

E-minor and A-minor are generally considered "mysterious." (Listen to Charles E. King's "Pehea Ho`i Au" as performed by the Brothers Cazimero.) B-minor is considered "dark and brooding." D-major is considered "proud and happy." F-major is considered "sexy or sultry." And modulation from a lower key to a higher often indicates an increase in energy even if the tempo remains the same.

Even chord types convey moods. I mean... Could you produce a murder mystery in the 1940's/50s without whole orchestras banging away at the same diminished chord? The intervals between the tones in a diminished chord leave these chords flush with the feeling of uncertainty or impending doom.

Join me for the history of Hawaiian music and its musicians at Ho`olohe Hou at www.hoolohehou.org.
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slipry1
Ha`aha`a

USA
1478 Posts

Posted - 07/27/2007 :  09:06:26 AM  Show Profile
quote:
Originally posted by noeau

Why play in G# is beyond me.



I try again (back from Alburqueque). G#, better known as Ab, is a pretty standard key for non-string instruments. For instance, jerome Kern wrote "All the Things You Are" in Ab although it wanders off to C then Eb then G then E, etc). If you transpose up to C, the Ab becomes a C, the Db becomes and F, etc. I suppose, the piano is a string instrument, but playing in A or E or B is a drag. Of couse, on the steel, it's "no boddah me" about keys.

keaka
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