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 Hawaiian Kine Bass
 Acoustic vs. Electric Bass
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wcerto
Ahonui

USA
5052 Posts

Posted - 08/17/2007 :  03:21:26 AM  Show Profile
How come not too many folks use stand up acoustic bass anymore? I love the sound, so deep and so rich. Electric bass keeps the rythym, but no depth, nothing mellow, no richness in my opinion. I really thought it was cool to see Joe Marshall holding that bass on his lap. And I think in the Sons of Hawai'i video, that I saw Ocean doing the same.

Me ke aloha
Malama pono,
Wanda

Rlowenote
Akahai

84 Posts

Posted - 08/17/2007 :  05:01:51 AM  Show Profile
I've played acoustic bass guitar in several groups in the past, including the first group I joined and the San Diego Mandolin Orchestra. I started with a Carlo Robelli plywood top (Sam Ash house brand) and now have a Martin Bass Guitar and a Tacoma Thunderchief bass as well. Both can be plugged in when needed. The Tacoma is my favorite and sounds the best. The acoustic strings are rough on the fingers. Electric bass strings are much friendlier.

In my case a stand up bass would cause many problems, mostly due to the size. I have no place to store it, and transporting it would be a problem. I think the only way I'd ever have a stand up bass is if someone gave it to me and I'd have to rearrange the house to keep it. Even some Bluegrass groups are starting to use an electric bass.

Ralph
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slipry1
Ha`aha`a

USA
1501 Posts

Posted - 08/17/2007 :  06:39:14 AM  Show Profile
quote:
Originally posted by Rlowenote

I've played acoustic bass guitar in several groups in the past, including the first group I joined and the San Diego Mandolin Orchestra. I started with a Carlo Robelli plywood top (Sam Ash house brand) and now have a Martin Bass Guitar and a Tacoma Thunderchief bass as well. Both can be plugged in when needed. The Tacoma is my favorite and sounds the best. The acoustic strings are rough on the fingers. Electric bass strings are much friendlier.

In my case a stand up bass would cause many problems, mostly due to the size. I have no place to store it, and transporting it would be a problem. I think the only way I'd ever have a stand up bass is if someone gave it to me and I'd have to rearrange the house to keep it. Even some Bluegrass groups are starting to use an electric bass.

Ralph


Before I became wrapped up in steel guitaring, I played bass, both acoustic & electric, and I have a deformed right index finger to prove it. In addition to the aforementioned transportation and storage problems, the bass viol is a physically punishing device. To avoid blisters and muscle cramping, it must be played every day, and, in the begining, aproached carefully, moreso than starting on guitar. I still have, and occasionaly play, my Fender P-Bass, which I love.

keaka
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Retro
Ahonui

USA
2368 Posts

Posted - 08/17/2007 :  07:06:55 AM  Show Profile  Visit Retro's Homepage
As Ralph said - transport and storage would be big issues for me. Plus, if you are like me (as a bass player, I put the "rude" in "rudimentary"), I still need frets for guidance, so a double-bass is trickier; that's why I sold the fretless acoustic bass guitar I had.

With the right processing and playing techniques, you can get a very acoustic sound out of an electric bass guitar. Just watch how Analu Aina dampens the strings slightly with his right hand. I haven't learned that skill yet.
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Konabob
`Olu`olu

USA
928 Posts

Posted - 08/17/2007 :  07:39:47 AM  Show Profile  Visit Konabob's Homepage  Send Konabob an AOL message
Maybe I am biased, but I just love my Walkingbass. Easy to transport, nice soft strings so I can play a 4 hour gig with no blisters, and my fellow musicians love the tone. I am playing with a local Hawaiian group tonight, and with Buddy Fo on Sunday. I knew that I would have trouble finding my way around an unmarked fingerboard, so I put dots along the side for all twelve frets. I coded them black and white so I
could easily find the sharps and flats. From the front, you can't see the dots, so the audience just assumes that you know your way around the instrument. Of course, it is tuned to an open G and has only three strings, so it takes the average bass player at least an extra half hour to learn. Folks that don't already play bass can usually learn it in 15 minutes.

Konabob's Walkingbass - http://www.konawalkingbass.com
Taropatch Steel - http://www.konaweb.com/konabob/
YouTube - http://www.youtube.com/results?search_type=&search_query=Konabob2+Walkingbass
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Mark
Ha`aha`a

USA
1628 Posts

Posted - 08/17/2007 :  09:12:37 AM  Show Profile  Visit Mark's Homepage
I started out as an electric bass player and still play the dang thing at every opportunity.

If you crave the "acoustic" sound, there are several ways around the size limitations. Some of the electric uprights, like the Clevinger http://www.clevinger.com/ and the Oregon bass, are very good indeed.

Most acoustic bass guitars are pretty thin acoustically, though a guy named Dave Maze has build some that actually pass the blindfold test. He seems to have disappeared, though.

My ancient Framus does a decent job of sounding acoustic... but the best alternative I've found is also the lightest: The Ashbory. Mine's an old Guild model, you can still find the newer DeArmands. Amazing little basses! http://www.largesound.com/ashborytour/.

Now if only I can find a replacement for the 12" fuzzy Polytone amp I foolishly let go 10 years ago...
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Mark
Ha`aha`a

USA
1628 Posts

Posted - 08/19/2007 :  09:02:50 AM  Show Profile  Visit Mark's Homepage
Here's a funny coincidance: I hadn't thought about Dave Maze in years... then last night I was playing bass at a jam session and the banjo player asked me if I knew his neighbor who built these amazing basses. So Dave is still around, though not as active as in years past:

Dave Maze Acoustic Bass Guitars
999 Holton Road
Talent, OR USA 97540
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